Greek Baking Powder Biscuit Piecrust


This is one of my favorite pie crusts when making vegetable-based tarts or quiches, such as my Garlicky Tomato Tart, which is a reformed Cooking Light recipe. Just like the tart needed some healthy updating – adding back grass-fed farm-fresh nutrients provided by properly-raised eggs and milk – the pie crust also needed some reclamation work, bringing it back in line with nutrient-dense foods of yesteryear, nearly lost to the industrialized, mass-produced, nutrient-deficient foods of today’s modern civilization.

Grinding my own grains, and soaking them in an acidified solutions goes a long way toward making the grains healthier and more easily digestible, explained in one of my favorite Weston A. Price articles, Be Kind To Your Grains.


Summer Time is Garlic Tomato Tart Time

Labor Day has come and gone, and with it, the end of summer. Radio ads are warning, “cold temperatures are just around the corner”, but my calendar says that nearly 1/3 of the summer remains, and I’m determined to enjoy every last minute of it, my favorite season.

Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own. Matthew 6

Besides, I’m not finished with my summer traditions, one of which is to make a lovely Garlicky Tomato Tart using fresh local produce from “our” organic CSA (Consumer Supported Agriculture) farm.

The original recipe goes back to my Dark Days of Food, when I was convinced that Cooking Light magazine knew what they were talking about when it came to “healthy” food, removing all things fat, substituting “light” foods void of fat. While not all fats are healthy, the right type of fats are essential to life, explained in The Skinny on Fats, a classic article written by Sally Fallon, author of “Nourishing Traditions”.


Beef Short Ribs

There are favorite foods from my childhood, such as Swedish Pancakes, that I hope my children will continue to make, passing along the recipe for generations yet to come.

There are other foods, like beef short ribs, that I decided would end with me. My mother was a good cook. Her marinara sauce, which gently simmered for hours to perfection, is not something I’ve successfully replicated. She made a veal “hotdish” (Midwestern roots are showing) that earned praises and cheers. But when it came to pork chops or beef short ribs, they were, at best, tedious to eat, always dry, leathery and tough. My father always graciously excused them, saying to my mother, “That’s just the nature of short ribs. Good sauce, honey!”