Indian Pudding

Indian Corn Pudding Pic A family favorite for many years, Indian Pudding dates back to Colonial America.

Indian pudding is a baked custard made from corn meal and milk, eggs and spices, and is sweetened by dark, rich molasses. According to “America’s Founding Food” authors Keith Stavely and Kathleen Fitzgerald, colonists used the word “Indian” when referring to corn or corn meal, not the indigenous peoples. This corn pudding became popular among colonial cooks around the time of this country’s independence. Culinary Institute of America


Quark By Any Other Name.....Is Still A Curd

…and because of the abundance of the milk produced he will eat curds, for everyone that is left within the land will eat curds and honey… Isaiah 7:22

Raw Dairy Poster What do you get when you combine three half-gallons of fresh, raw, grass-fed milk, with an extended power outage?

Curds!

And whey!

Every once in awhile, some good comes from New England’s downed power lines!

Whey, in the mind of most moderns, is a by-product of cheesemaking, dumped as waste, or fed to livestock. But, when it is made with real, raw milk – the kind cows make from eating grass – whey is wonderfully healthy and has a wide variety of uses.


Egg Nog II

Mug of Egg Nog Nope, this isn’t a new recipe. I’m still perfectly thrilled with my discovery last year, – adding heated milk and sugar to whisked egg yolks – making a basic Creme Anglaise which turns into an absolutely lovely eggnog mixture. I made another batch this weekend – quadrupling the following recipe, and then cooling it outside on my deck. I love cooking in winter. Well, at least in New England. I couldn’t say the same in Florida where even the tap water ran warm in the middle of the winter.


Easy Ricotta (Ricotone) Cheese 101

Draining the whey from the curds is a process by which you can control the density, dryness or creaminess by the length of the time. Shorter periods of time – 4 to 6 hours result in a creamy, almost Mascarpone
texture, wonderful for tiramisus. Longer draining, 6-12 hours, results in a drier texture for making a New York style cheesecake, or stuffing layers of Sunday-morning French toast. The possibilities are limitless…..


Butter Making 101, 102, 103, 104.......

When the Almighty was yet with me,
And my children were around me;
When my steps were bathed in butter,
And the rock poured out for me streams of oil!
- Job 29:5-6

I was 5 years old when I first tasted freshly-made butter. My kindergarten teacher ceremoniously emptied contents of a Piggy Wiggly paper shopping bag (plastic hadn’t become popular yet) – freshly baked bread, a quart-jar loaded with fresh cream, and a beautiful silver butter knife from her grandmother’s special tea service – announcing, “a very special treat made by your very own hands.”

Oh, the beauty of harnessing natural energy and enthusiasm of 30 5-year-olds, shaking ordinary cream into a lifetime of fond memories! When all that remained was the sloshing of the thin buttermilk and the butter clump thumping against the side of the jar, our teacher proclaimed, “Done! Gather ‘round and share our creation!” The amazing flavor and texture was like nothing I’d ever tasted, or would for many years to come.